Article of the Week

Run-On Sentences

Run-on sentences occur when writers try to combine more than one idea into a single sentence. They cause confusion because readers are not sure when one idea ends and the next one begins. Read our entry and test your knowledge with our quiz!



Conclusions

Papers need conclusions because readers have short attention spans. At the end of your paper, your readers should already know your main point and its supporting evidence, but sometimes they need reminders. Your readers will remember more details of your argument if your conclusion gives them another peek at the blueprint. Your conclusion exists to show how your ideas fit together, and to remind readers why they matter.

Don’t use your conclusion to supply new ideas, because all of your ideas deserve to be introduced, discussed, and analyzed at length in the body of your paper. But you can use it to restate your main points, re-establish the sides of the issue, and re-emphasize the relevance of the paper. Your conclusion can also suggest further research or action.

Here’s the conclusion to an essay that focused on texting etiquette:

While many teens and young adults consider it rude to ignore texts, it’s even ruder to text during class or work. Students may believe that they can both text and contribute to a discussion or listen to a lecture, but studies have shown that most people do not multitask effectively. And texting almost always conflicts with completing work. When young people text while in the middle of another task, they make a choice to honor their social commitments over their education and work.


Each sentence of this conclusion has an important role to play:

"While many teens and young adults consider it rude to ignore texts, it’s even ruder to text during class or work."

This sentence shows the two main sides of the controversy, and restates a claim.

"Students may believe that they can both text and contribute to a discussion or listen to a lecture, but studies have shown that most people do not multitask effectively."

This sentence restates one of the main points: multitasking leads to lower performance.

"And texting almost always conflicts with completing work."

Another related point: texting gets in the way of more important tasks.

"When young people text while in the middle of another task, they make a choice to honor their social commitments over their education and work."

This sentence re-establishes the stakes of the argument; texting is not just a distraction, it’s an ethical issue.


Make sure that there are similar reasons behind each sentence in your conclusion.